Secular Right | Reality & Reason

Nov/12

25

Atheism & Islam

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Barack Obama:

“But even as this land of my youth has changed in so many ways, those things that I learned to love about Indonesia — that spirit of tolerance that is written into your constitution, symbolized in your mosques and churches and temples standing alongside each other; that spirit that is embodied in your people — that still lives on…”

The Economist:

A mob attacked Alexander Aan even before an Indonesian court in June jailed him for two and a half years for “inciting religious hatred”. His crime was to write “God does not exist” on a Facebook group he had founded for atheists in Minang, a province of the world’s most populous Muslim nation. Like most non-believers in Islamic regions, he was brought up as a Muslim. And like many who profess godlessness openly, he has been punished.

And note that the language of PC/neo-blasphemy legislation (“inciting religious hatred”) is what is used to condemn him.

The Economist continues:

In a handful of majority-Muslim countries atheists can live safely, if quietly; Turkey is one example, Lebanon another. None makes atheism a specific crime. But none gives atheists legal protection or recognition. Indonesia, for example, demands that people declare themselves as one of six religions; atheism and agnosticism do not count.

What was it that Obama was saying about “the spirit of tolerance” written into the Indonesian constitution?

But at least that’s better than what Egypt is contemplating:

Egypt’s draft constitution makes room for only three faiths: Christianity, Judaism and Islam.
Sharia law, which covers only Muslims unless incorporated into national law, assumes people are born into their parents’ religion. Thus ex-Muslim atheists are guilty of apostasy—a hudud crime against God, like adultery and drinking alcohol. Potential sanctions can be severe: eight states, including Iran, Saudi Arabia, Mauritania and Sudan have the death penalty on their statute books for such offences.

The Economist goes on to note that “such penalties are rarely carried out”. Most atheists are prosecuted for blasphemy or for “inciting hatred”.

There we go again.

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1 comment

  • Michael R · November 25, 2012 at 11:41 pm

    Turkey may not outlaw atheists yet. But in practise, it now has hundreds of journalists and military men in jail or on trumped-up charges i.e. the Ergenekon case. Prime Minister Erdogan has used the police and courts to finally remove the last bastions of Ataturk’s secularism. Turkey is falling into line with the rest of the Islamic world, which does not tolerate dissent.

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