Secular Right | Reality & Reason

Dec/10

22

A republic we no longer keep?

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10 comments

  • Meng Bomin · December 22, 2010 at 9:14 am

    War brings the rhetoric of democracy?

  • Clark · December 22, 2010 at 8:00 pm

    I doubt most people even know what “Republic” means.

    It’s interesting how the political parties use both terms. It’s also interesting how the parties have moved towards fulfilling the labels. Democrats tend (IMO) to favor a full democratic view of government, blurring states rights and often even preferring to make the Senate more democratic (i.e. make it more proportional representation) Likewise Republicans tend to be the party that emphasizes government limits (interstate commerce clause), states rights, and so forth.

    It’s not perfect of course. Republicans bemoaned the filibuster when they were in power. And Republicans seem quite willing to impose on civil liberties and state rights when the mood suits them. But in general I think it reflects the general orientation of the parties.

  • Clark · December 22, 2010 at 8:00 pm

    I doubt most people even know what “Republic” means.

    It’s interesting how the political parties use both terms. It’s also interesting how the parties have moved towards fulfilling the labels. Democrats tend (IMO) to favor a full democratic view of government, blurring states rights and often even preferring to make the Senate more democratic (i.e. make it more proportional representation) Likewise Republicans tend to be the party that emphasizes government limits (interstate commerce clause), states rights, and so forth.

    It’s not perfect of course. Republicans bemoaned the filibuster when they were in power. And Republicans seem quite willing to impose on civil liberties and state rights when the mood suits them. But in general I think it reflects the general orientation of the parties.

  • Bob_R · December 22, 2010 at 10:10 pm

    The decline in the use of “republic” corresponds pretty well with the decline in the number of large monarchies. Since republic vs. monarchy is one of the most common distinctions in forms of government it’s just not very relevant any more. I think that Madison’s usage is taught as direct democracy vs. representative democracy in schools today.

  • Susan · December 22, 2010 at 10:32 pm

    I agree that probably most people don’t understand what a republic is. Nor do thy understand what a democracy, in the classical sense, actually is.

  • Susan · December 22, 2010 at 10:34 pm

    It should be “they,” not “thy,” in my post above. I hate to use language that might be construed as Biblical (King James version)at Secular Right.

  • John · December 24, 2010 at 12:43 am

    I can see two trends here. One is the long term trend that “republic” has declined, and “democracy” had risen. The other is that the the short term trends coincide. As one rises, the other rises. So the terms don’t seem to be in direct opposition to each other. It’s something else going on.

    I agree that most people couldn’t say what a republic is. And, “enumerated powers”? Forget about it. The idea that Congress is supposed to pass laws about a limited number of things is a completely foriegn concept. “Well, if the people want it shouldn’t they get it? That’s democracy!” Sigh.

  • asdf · December 26, 2010 at 5:57 pm

    The best one is “racist, sexist, homophobic”. Like clockwork coming off the axis at 20 year intervals.

    I wonder what the next one will be. “patriotic”?

  • Stephen · December 27, 2010 at 11:32 pm

    Try: atheist,agnostic

  • Sully · January 2, 2011 at 11:56 pm

    Meng’s catch is interesting. It sure does seem that war spurs more talk of Democracy, but no rise in talk of the Republic. Perhaps as justification (or anesthesia) relative to the draft?

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